So now the really big question: what do I do with my break?I could just forge ahead with the prelim...

So now the really big question: what do I do with my break?

I could just forge ahead with the prelim work for Book 3, which I should prepare you all, the working title is a little horrendous. It’s currently called Project Golden Abortion.

I could start a totally different book, that actually has nothing to do with any incarnation of Bonelfoermos or Thulebelore. I’ve got a couple of ideas floating around, one even has a few pages started. 

I could write a short story. For which I have zero ideas but, you know, it might be cool to finish whatever I start in the break. 

I could actually not write and devote myself to other tasks. Which I have to do a little bit anyway. :p The new tax season is coming. :p

Al Vernacchio’s TED talk about the metaphor of sexualityI found...



Al Vernacchio’s TED talk about the metaphor of sexuality

I found this both very funny and an interesting idea. I think I like it. And the more I think about it, the more I think I like it. So… thought I’d share. Warning for explicit topic and some explicit language. And, you know, I can’t resist something that is about metaphors.

Why “Just Write!” Is Terrible Advice to Give to Novice Writers

Why “Just Write!” Is Terrible Advice to Give to Novice Writers:

the960writers:

Insisting that successful writers are writers who never stopped practicing their craft is logically true, i.e., true in the semantic sense that it’s impossible for you to become exceptional at x if you never actually engage in x.

You’re not going to develop into a master carpenter if you never practice carpentry; similarly, mastering the art of writing can’t be achieved in the absence of lots and lots of actual writing.

However, “just writing” is not what explains why certain authors become highly skilled and others don’t.

If this were the case then everybody who writes for hours each day (or week) would eventually mature into a first-rate writer, which obviously doesn’t happen.

I 100% agree but even for me, the master of the “god oh god why can’t I shut up and say something short for once” tag, this is a bit long winded. You may want to break it into two readings.

The truth is that WHAT you write is at least as important as that you do. And HOW you learn from it is a vital necessity.

Done

Limping in at a bloated 151,500 words / 508 manuscript pages, the rough of The Lights of Other Lives crosses the finish line a bit less than three years late. 

Now it goes to The Wonder Hutch and I simply refuse to think about it for a while. Hooray.

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